1. image: Download

    cyprith:

wintergrey:

Reminder that Ferguson is a food desert and school is canceled. People’s movement is restricted. The work of the St Louis Food Bank is vital right now. Help if you can. (x)
STL FOOD BANK

Consider also donating in Michael Brown’s name, as the erin e did above.
Let the Ferguson police department know:

Ferguson Police Department
222 S Florissant Rd
Ferguson, MO 63135
314-522-3100

    cyprith:

    wintergrey:

    Reminder that Ferguson is a food desert and school is canceled. People’s movement is restricted. The work of the St Louis Food Bank is vital right now. Help if you can. (x)

    STL FOOD BANK

    Consider also donating in Michael Brown’s name, as the erin e did above.

    Let the Ferguson police department know:

    Ferguson Police Department
    222 S Florissant Rd
    Ferguson, MO 63135
    314-522-3100
     
  2. 18:01

    Notes: 17

    Reblogged from sashimigrade

    Tags: racismimmigrationelections

    As House Democrats Joe Garcia and Ted Deutch praised President Obama as “solid” on immigration, several attendees wore “Obama Deports Parents” t-shirts. The lawmakers touted their work in Congress: introducing bills that were never voted on and writing to President Obama urging an executive order to stem deportations. But speaker after speaker who testified that day burst into angry tears as they told of terrifying raids on their homes and workplaces, and immigration hearings where children as young as 3 years old have no legal representation.
    “This is a period of shame for our country,” said Maria Rodriguez with the Florida Immigrant Coalition.
    While plenty of anger was targeted at Republicans, who have refused to let the House vote on the Senate’s comprehensive immigration reform bill, and instead have voted on bills to further militarize the border and strip migrant children of their legal rights, there was also plenty of frustration with the President and his party.
    “I see them all as beholden to economic interests–the Democrats just as much as the Republicans,” Florida-based social worker Grace Toapanta told ThinkProgress. “I think Democrats are afraid of losing these next elections, so they’re proposing a lot of things that may never come true, just to get the Latino vote. I’m a Democrat, but right now I’m unsure who to vote for.”
     
  3. [TW: Rape, Transmisogyny]

    In the past week, two particularly egregious articles were published on the site. The first, by noted bigot Gavin McInnes — the illustrious scribe behind “Hey, Ladies! Short Hair Is Rape,” and “When It’s OK To Hit A Woman” — was titled “Transphobia Is Perfectly Natural.” It’s since been hidden behind a warning screen, reported by the community as “hateful or abusive content,” and McInnes has been asked to take a leave of absence from the advertising company he founded for being a prejudiced, terrible shit. One wonders why this backlash took so long, given the shocking amount of of misogynist, racist, homophobic, transphobic, and otherwise reprehensible content McInnes has been known to spew across the Internet. The second piece, by a writer named Anthony Rogers, was entitled “Ferguson, Missouri Looks Like a Rap Video.” It’s also been tagged as “hateful or abusive,” because it was.

    Yes, both pieces were dealt with after a great deal of public outcry, but it’s troubling that they were allowed to be posted — and tweeted out to Thought Catalog’s 363,000 followers — in the first place. It’s also troubling that McInnes was allowed to publish such patently unacceptable content on such a large platform for so long, and it’s upsetting that he’s not the only bigot who regularly vomits up “relevant thinking” for the site. But bigoted vomiting is built into the business model, it seems: when Caroline O’Donovan of the Nieman Lab reached out to a Thought Catalog publisher for comment or justification, he responded, “This particular piece was not screened by a producer” and added that Thought Catalog will allow pretty much anything to go on their website: “basically just email us,” he said, and you can publish whatever you want.

     
  4. 15:30

    Notes: 1933

    Reblogged from moo-ahyou

    Tags: autismanxietynonverbal

    palladiumlyre:

    stimmyabby:

    I have access to speech at least 85% of the time, but that doesn’t mean that during those times I am as verbal as a person without autism. Here are some examples of having access to speech while having speech trouble:

    I have access to automatic speech, but not conscious speech.

    For example I might see a dog and say, “Puppy!”, but by the time I’ve gone through I want to pat the dog, to pat the dog you have to ask the owner, the owner is over there, I should say please, I want to say to the person over there “Can I pet your dog please?” I can’t figure out how to get the words to come out of my mouth.

    I have access to prompted speech, but not unprompted speech.

    For example, if you ask me what book I am reading, I might be able to tell you it’s Bridge to Terabithia, and it’s good, but if I see you sitting across the room and want to tell you what I’m reading about I will not be able to initiate the conversation.

    I have access to planned out speech, but not spontaneous speech.

    I have to memorize what I’m going to say and how my mouth is going to move to say it, before I say it.

    I have access to speech but it’s mentally exhausting. 

    OR

    I have access to speech but it’s physically exhausting.

    OR

    I have access to speech but it’s physically painful.

    OR

    I have access to speech but I have to attempt talking many times before the words actually come out of my mouth.

    I have access to speech, but only scripted speech.

    This can be because I don’t have access to new words, or because I don’t have time to create new words and log them and run them through filters (not even necessarily filters of “is this polite” but filters of “is this actually true”) while carrying on a conversation, or because other people’s words are more comfortable then my own.

    Most of what I say is a patchwork quilt of scripts pulled out of the scrap bag of my brain and hemmed together, actually.

    Scripted speech isn’t necessarily bad or noncommunicative, and there are different levels of scriptedness from “kneejerk response” (“How are you? Fine”) to “looking for scripts that fit what I’m trying to say and splicing them together”. (I sometimes create scripts in advance specially for specific conversations with specific people. That is definitely not noncommunicative.)

    I have access to speech, but not the words I want to say.

    "Make no because the thing is curtaining" I say, unable to do grammar entirely, hoping someone will turn off the light. When I looked for pictures of light in my brain, I found a picture of light filtering through curtains, and "make no" means "make not exist". Communicative, but damn hard to understand. 

    A side note: it is cruel to make someone in this state use proper grammar or polite phrasing before you acknowledge what they have said.

    I have access to speech, but not communication.

    This can contain some or none of things above, and it’s hard to talk well about. What I can say is:

    -A lot of it was taught to me by therapy

    -For a long time, and still now sometimes, people labled uncommunication as real communication and real communication as uncommunication

    -Just because someone does things that look communicative that aren’t, doesn’t mean they don’t do things that are communicative, and doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try to figure out how they communicate, and listen.

    this is all super important and you should all at least skim through it cus this is the most succinct thing ive seen on this topic

     
  5. 15:30 19th Aug 2014

    Notes: 85163

    Reblogged from therareandferociousswamprabbit

    2damnfeisty:

    "14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

    So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

    Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

    Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

    Read more here. [x]

    Black Excellence

    (Source: skulls-and-tea)